Mediation Myth Busters

Ten Best Practices for Mediators Derived from Neuroscience: Managing Emotions (#6-8)

Strong emotions are common in mediation. Parties often arrive at the session full of resentment and joint sessions can provoke anger, disappointment, or embarrassment. Ignoring strong emotions is risky as it is trigger for the physiologic stress response.     6.Encourage parties to name their emotions rather than labeling them. Mediation training often suggests ways [Read more..]

Ten Best Practices for Mediators Derived from Neuroscience: Managing Stress (#4-5)

Stressors are commonly present at the start of mediation that trigger the physiologic stress response. Stressors include high emotions as well as dealing with an unfamiliar setting or process, meeting an authority figure, facing an adversary, and speaking in front of a hostile audience. When the stress response is repeatedly triggered, hormones build up and [Read more..]

Ten Best Practices for Mediators Derived from Neuroscience: The Start of Mediation (#1-3)

Mediation parties are subject to repeated physiological stress triggers at the start of mediation. The build up of hormones as a result of these triggers can disrupt the mediation process by interfering with a parties’ ability to process information, consider other points of view and make decisions.     Start mediations with a short caucus [Read more..]

Ten Best Practices for Mediators Derived from Neuroscience

We have collaborated for the past five years to find evidence from neuroscience that can help mediators be more effective. Our goal has always been to provide practicing mediators with clear advice on how to improve their skills. Accordingly, we begin by offering our Top Ten Best Practices for Mediators. Future posts will elaborate on [Read more..]

Welcome to Mediation Myth Busters!

Our goal for this blog is to explain how applying neuroscience concepts can improve mediation. While we have given conference and workshop presentations  and published a law review article, we wanted to make our ideas more accessible to a wider audience by breaking them down into small focused topics. Today, we begin by introducing ourselves and [Read more..]